Skip to main content

Prior to working with the port, Tea Times shipped containers into Felixstowe and transported raw tea by road to an inland warehouse before being moved to the tea packing site. This was subject to delays due to traffic congestion and more recently, lorry driver shortages.

By shipping containers straight to South Shields and using the Port’s onsite warehouses, the company said it would be saving more than 25,000 road miles and 35,000kg of carbon dioxide.

Competitive advantages

Tea Times said the shift toward a port centric model had afforded it a number of competitive advantages, including a means to offset raw material price fluctuations with lower shipping costs and protecting its customer service reputation by mitigating driver shortages.

Director Patrick Busse said: “Working with the Port of Tyne brings many benefits at a critical time in the growth of the company. Port centric logistics is definitely the way forward for any business that wants to help achieve its net zero targets.”

The manufacturer’s move away from truck-based logistics comes four months after Tea giant Tetley awarded the Port of Tyne a long-term logistics and distribution contract,​ building on its existing 20-year partnership.

Move towards ports

Richard Newton, commercial director for logistics at the Port of Tyne, added: “An ever-increasing number of companies are deciding to ship into their local ports instead.

“As one of the UK’s deepest sea ports and with excellent links out to industrial hubs, the Port of Tyne is a very convenient option for manufacturers in any industry sector.”

Source

© 2020 Org 3D. All Rights Reserved,